Common Export documents

Commercial invoice - a bill for the goods from the seller to the buyer. These invoices are often used by governments to determine the true value of goods when assessing customs duties. Governments that use the commercial invoice to control imports will often specify its form, content, number of copies, language to be used, and other characteristics

 

Certificate of origin - The Certificate of Origin is only required by some countries. In many cases, a statement of origin printed on company letterhead will suffice. .

 

Bill of lading is a contract between the owner of the goods and the carrier (as with domestic shipments). For vessels, there are two types: a straight bill of lading which is non-negotiable and a negotiable or shipper's order bill of lading. The latter can be bought, sold, or traded while the goods are in transit. The customer usually needs an original as proof of ownership to take possession of the goods

Insurance certificate - is used to assure the consignee that insurance will cover the loss of or damage to the cargo during transit

 

Export packing list - It itemizes the material in each individual package and indicates the type of package, such as a box, crate, drum, or carton.

Import License – Import licenses are the responsibility of the importer. Including a copy with the rest of your documentation, however, can sometimes help avoid problems with customs in the destination country.

 

Consular invoice - Required in some countries, it describes the shipment of goods and shows information such as the consignor, consignee, and value of the shipment. If required, copies are available from the destination countrys embassy

 

Air way bills - Air freight shipments are handled by air waybills, which can never be made in negotiable form

 

Inspection certification is required by some purchasers and countries in order to attest to the specifications of the goods shipped. This is usually performed by a third party and often obtained from independent testing organizations.

 

A dock receipt and a warehouse receipt are used to transfer accountability when the export item is moved by the domestic carrier to the port of embarkation and left with the ship line for export.